Steven Pirutinsky, Ph.D

Associate Professor

Graduate School of Social Work

Biography

Steven Tzvi Pirutinsky has a B.T.S. from Beth Medrash Govoha, an M.S. in Clinical Psychology from Teachers College – Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University. He joined Touro College Graduate School of Social Work in 2016. He is a licensed clinical psychologist whose clinical practice includes services such as individual and group psychotherapy for adolescents and adults, psychological and educational assessments, couple's therapy, treatment of sexual behavior problems, and career counseling and assessment. At Touro, he teaches Human Behavior in the Social Environment, Clinical Social Work Practice, and Research courses, and he maintains an active research program focused on the intersections between spirituality, religion, culture, mental health, and well-being, particularly within the Orthodox Jewish community. He is also interested in cutting-edge research and statistical methods, and serves as a consultant for a number of large ongoing research projects.

Publications

Pirutinsky, S. (in press). I created the evil inclination and I created Torah its antidote: An Indigenous Jewish Psychology. In T. A. Sisemore & J. J. Knabbs (Eds.), The Psychology of World Religions and Spiritualties: An Indigenous Perspective. Philadelphia, PA: Templeton University Press.

Pirutinsky, S., Cherniak, A., & Rosmarin, D. H. (in press). Implicit and explicit attitudes towards God and life satisfaction. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality.

Eichorn, N., Pirutinsky, S., & Marton, K. (in press). Effects of different attention tasks on concurrent speech in adults who stutter and fluent controls. Journal of Fluency Disorders.

Pirutinsky, S., Rosmarin, D. H., Kirkpatrick, L. A. (2019). Is Attachment to God a Unique Predictor of Mental Health? Test in a Jewish Sample. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 29, 161-171.

Shoshani, A., Kor, A., Pirutinsky, S., Mikulincer, M., & Miller, L. (2019). A Longitudinal Study of Spirituality, Character Strengths, Subjective Well-being, and Prosociality in Middle School Adolescents. Frontiers in Psychology, 10:377, 1 – 12.

Rosmarin, D. H., & Pirutinsky, S. (2019). Problematic sexual behavior and religion among Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jewish males: An initial study. American Journal of Men’s Health, 13, 1 – 12.

Pirutinsky, S. (in press). Religion and Compulsive Sexuality: A response to Efrati’s (2018) God, I can’t stop thinking about sex! Journal of Sex Research, 56, 142–143.

Eichorn, N., Marton, K., & Pirutinsky, S. (2018).  Cognitive Flexibility in Preschool Children with and without Stuttering Disorders. Journal of Fluency Disorders, 57, 37-50.

Rosmarin, D. H., Pirutinsky, S., Appel, M., Kaplan, T., & Pelcovitz, D. (2018). Childhood sexual abuse, mental health, and religion across the Jewish community. Child Abuse and Neglect, 81, 21-28.

Midlarsky, E., Pirutinsky, S., Chakrabarti, D., & Cohen, F. (2018). Visualized prosocial behavior and emotion in late life. Journal of Positive Psychology, 13, 485-493.

Pirutinsky, S., & Rosmarin, D. H. (2018). The PIOS among the Pious: Validity of the Penn Inventory of Scrupulosity (PIOS) among Orthodox Jews. Mental Health, Religion, and Culture, 21, 180-193.

Pirutinsky, S., & Rosmarin, D. H. (2018). Protective and Harmful Effects of Religious Practice on Depression among Jewish Individuals with Mood Disorders. Clinical Psychological Science, 6, 601-609.

Midlarsky, E., Kronen-Marotta, A., Pirutinsky, S., Morin, R.., & McGowan, J.  (2018). Psychological predictors of eating pathology in older adult women.  Journal of Women and Aging. 30, 145-157.

Rosmarin, D. H., Pirutinsky, S., Carp, S., Appel, M., & Kor, A. (2017). Religious coping across a spectrum of religious involvement among Jews. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 9(Suppl 1), S96-S104.

Pirutinsky, S., Carp, S., & Rosmarin, D. H. (2017). A paradigm to assess implicit attitudes towards God: The positive/negative God associations task. Journal of Religion and Health, 56(1), 305-319. (Recipient of APA Div. 36 Student Research Award)

Maybruch, C., Pirutinsky, S., & Weissman, S. (2017). Marital Outcomes and Consideration of Divorce Among Orthodox Jews After Signing a Religious Prenuptial Agreement to Facilitate Future Divorce. Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, 58¸276-287.

Eichorn, N., Marton, K., Schwartz, R. G., Melara, R. D., & Pirutinsky, S. (2016). Does working memory enhance or interfere with speech fluency in adults who do and do not stutter? Evidence from a dual-task paradigm. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 59(3), 415-429.

Rosmarin, D. H., Pirutinsky, S., Shabtai, D., & Korbman, M. (2016). Maintaining a grateful disposition in the face of distress: The role of spirituality. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 8, 134-140.

Shabtai, D. G., Pirutinsky, S., & Rosmarin, D. H. (2016). Integrating Judaism into Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. In Applied Jewish Values in Social Sciences and Psychology (pp. 133-149). Springer International Publishing.

Lazarus, Z., Pirutinsky, S., Korbman, M., & Rosmarin, D. H. (2015). Dental disparities in a Jewish context: Reasons and potential solutions. Community Dental Health Journal, 32, 247-51.

Pirutinsky, S., Siev, J., & Rosmarin, D. H. (2015). Scrupulosity and implicit and explicit beliefs about God. Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, 6, 33-38.

Pirutinsky, S., Kor, A., Schechter, I., & Rosmarin, D. H. (2015). Family size and psychological functioning in the Orthodox Jewish community. Mental Health, Religion, and Culture, 18, 218-230.

Maybruch, C., Pirutinsky, S., & Pelcovitz, D. (2014). Religious premarital education and marital quality within the Orthodox Jewish community. Journal of Couple and Relationship Therapy, 13, 365–381.

Pirutinsky, S. (2014). Does religiousness increase self-control and reduce criminal behavior? A longitudinal analysis of adolescent offenders. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 41, 1290-1307.

Baruch, D. E., Kanter, J. W., Pirutinsky, S., Murphy, J, & Rosmarin, D. H. (2014). Depression stigma and treatment preferences among Orthodox and non-Orthodox Jews. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 202, 556-561.

Pirutinsky, S., Midlarsky, E., Kor, A., & Pelcovitz, D. (2014). The impact of religious conflict within Orthodox Jewish families in Israel. Mental Health, Religion, and Culture, 17, 665 -679. (Recipient of Dean’s Doctoral Research Fellowship)

Pirutinsky, S., & Rosmarin, D. H. (2014). Book review: A new approach to religious orientation: The commitment-reflectivity circumplex. Journal of Religion and Health, 53, 631-633.

Pirutinsky, S. (2014). The Marriage and Family Stigma Scale for Mental Illness. Washington, DC: PsycTESTS American Psychological Association.

Research

FUNDED PROJECTS

Attentional Bias and religious coping (2018-2019)

Grant Type: Touro College, Presidential Research and Development Grant ($6,000)
Role: Principal Investigator
Major goals: To develop an experimental method that can assess the relationship between religious coping, attentional biases, and mental health and conduct an initial test of related hypotheses.

Clinical Measurement Initiative, Center for Anxiety (2015-2018)

Grant Type: Private donation ($90,000 over three-years)
Role: Design Consultant and Statistical Analyst
Major goals: To collect data from patients presenting for outpatient treatment at the Center for Anxiety at each point of clinical contact, in order to allow clinicians to monitor treatment effects in real-time and make necessary modifications to help maximize outcomes

Integrating Networks and Systems to achieve Patient health care Integration Reform Effectively, Center for Health, Education, Medicine, and Dentistry (2015-2017)

Grant Type: Foundational Support (Nicholson Foundation, $532,651 over 3 years)
Role: Program Administrator (Grant Writing, Scientific Advisor, Data Analysis, Reporting)
Major goals: To develop, deliver, and evaluate integrated behavioral-health care in primary care, pediatrics, and women’s health settings including standardized screenings and assessments, brief psychotherapy, case management, and web-based computerized CBT.

A six-wave longitudinal and experimental investigation on Judaism and mental health (2012-2016)

Grant Type: Private donation ($180,000 over three-years)
Role: Secondary investigator (PI: David H. Rosmarin, Harvard Medical School)
Major goals: To advance the study of Jewish spirituality and mental health with a six-wave longitudinal study involving both self-report and experimental tasks to assess spiritual and religious beliefs and practices

Use of the Strong Interest Inventory among ultra-Orthodox Jewish young adults (2011-2012)

Grant Type: Private Donation (CPP Inc., $500 and data support)
Role: Principal-investigator
Major Goals: To validate the Strong Interest Inventory for us among ultra-Orthodox Jewish young adults and develop culturally relevant norms and interpretative guidelines.

Interpersonal impact of religious and spiritual values within families (2012-2013)

Grant Type: Foundational Support (TAG Foundation, $5,000)
Role: Principal-investigator
Major Goals: To analyze a large dyadic and multimethod dataset of Orthodox Jewish Israeli couples and assess the impact of religious conflict and family functioning.

Spirituality & Mental health: Development of an experimental paradigm (2010-2011)

Grant Type: Foundation support (F.I.S.H. Foundation, $2,500)
Role: Principal investigator (co-PI: David H. Rosmarin, Harvard Medical School)
Major Goals: To develop and pilot stimuli to assess positive vs. negative views of God in the context of the Go-No-Go-Association Task (GNAT)

Spiritually integrated treatment for subclinical generalized anxiety disorder in the Jewish community, delivered via the Internet: A randomized controlled trial (2007-2009)

Grant Type: Private donation ($75,000)
Role: Research Design and Statistical Analysis (PI: David H. Rosmarin, Harvard Medical School)
Major Goals: To develop and evaluate the comparative efficacy of a self-administered spiritually based treatment for symptoms of stress and worry

Stigma, culture and mental health in the Jewish community (2007-2009)

Grant Type: Private donation ($15,000)
Role: Principal investigator (co-PI: David H. Rosmarin, Harvard Medical School)
Major Goals: To examine stigma, culture-influenced symptoms, and attitudes towards medical vs. behavioral models of mental illness in the Jewish community

Honors

  • Best Faculty Publication in Social, Behavioral, Educational Sciences, Touro Research Day (2019)
  • Presidential Research Development Grant, Touro College (2018)
  • ASHA Convention Meritorious Poster Award (2016)
  • Greater NY Conference on Behavioral Research: Bernard Lander Award (2013)
  • American Psychological Association, Society for the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality (Div. 36): Student Research Award (2012)
  • Teachers College, Columbia University: Dean’s Doctoral Research Fellowship (2012)
  • TAG Foundation: Emerging Scholar Award (2012)
  • Greater NY Conference on Behavioral Research: A. Vincent Toth Award (2011)
  • Greater NY Conference on Behavioral Research: Bernard Lander Award (2011)
  • ABCT Annual Conference: Elsie Ramos Memorial Student Research Award (co-author) (2010)
  • Teachers College, Columbia University: Rosalea Schonbar Excellence in Research Award (2010)